In Memory of

ALFRED BEEBEE

Corporal
14956
18th Sqdn., Royal Flying Corps
who died on
Sunday, 29th April 1917. Age 18.

Additional Information: Croix de Guerre (France). Son of George and Alice Beebee, of 119, Broad St., Birmingham.

Commemorative Information

Memorial: ARRAS FLYING SERVICES MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France
Location: The Arras Flying Services Memorial will be found in the Faubourg-d'Amiens Cemetery, which is in the Boulevard du General de Gaulle in the western part of the town of Arras. The cemetery is near the Citadel, approximately 2 kilometres due west of the railway station. The Arras Memorial, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, is a cloister, 25 feet high and 380 feet long, built up on Doric columns, and faces west. In the broader part of the site the colonnade returns to form a recessed and open court, terminated by an apse, and in front of the apse is the Arras Flying Services Memorial. The names of the casualties are carved on stone panels fixed to the cloister walls or the Flying Services Memorial. The Arras Flying Services Memorial commemorates casualties of the Royal Naval Air Service, the Royal Flying Corps, and the Royal Air Force, either by attachment from other arms of the forces of the Commonwealth or by original enlistment, who fell on the whole Western Front and who have no known grave. The British Air Services originated in the use of balloons for purposes of reconnaissance. The balloon gave way to power-driven air machines and in 1911 an Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers was formed. In 1912 the Air Battalion was absorbed into the Royal Flying Corps which consisted of a Naval Wing and a Military Wing and a Central Flying School. These two wings developed during the course of the war, both sections expanding greatly until they combined and the Royal Air Force came into being on the 1 April 1918.

Historical Information: The Arras Memorial, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, is a cloister, 25 feet high and 380 feet long, built up on Doric columns, and facing West. In the broader part of the site, the colonnade returns to form a recessed and open court, terminated by an apse, and in front of the apse is the memorial of the Flying Services. The names of the war dead are carved on stone panels, fixed to the Flying Services Memorial. On these panels are inscribed the names of the officers and men having no known grave, of the Royal Naval Air Service, the Royal Flying Corps, the Royal Air Force and the Australian Flying Corps, either by attachment from other arms of the forces of the Commonwealth or by original enlistment. The British Air Services originated in the use of balloons for purposes of reconnaissance. The balloon gave way to power-driven air machines and in 1911 an Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers was formed. In 1912 the Air Battalion was absorbed into the Royal Flying Corps which consisted of a Naval Wing and a Military Wing and a Central Flying School. These two wings developed during the course of the war, both sections expanding greatly until they combined and the Royal Air Force came into being on the 1 April 1918.